Terrible Twos

I am a hypocrite.

Every single day I am reminded of how much I detest labels and trying to pigeonhole people into being one thing or another. My belief is that it almost always does more harm than good and yet I am just as guilty of it.

A teen, a tween and a toddler. That’s my reply when asked about my kids. But Col is more than a teen, Bess is not just a tween and Moose is so much more than a toddler. 

Terrible two’s? 

I think I hate this term most of all. We bring our child into this world and we dote on them. We feed and nurture them and then the moment they begin to develop their own sense of their little selves? BAM we slap on the label of “terrible two’s”. For what? For acting like a toddler? What were we expecting?

There are articles in loads of parenting magazines telling us how we should “tackle the terrible twos” but maybe we should be looking at things a little differently if we want to do this successfully. I think it should be less about tackling and more about understanding. Them and us. 

Try to think about this from your kid’s perspective. 

Your little darling is throwing himself on the floor in screaming rage because you “broke” their banana (a Moose favourite). It might seem silly to you but to him, it’s a very real and perfectly valid reason to feel upset. He is a tiny person trying to deal with feelings too big still for him to contain let alone understand. 

During a tantrum any parent will tell you that reasoning with the child is not an option. That’s because the fight or flight part of their brain has taken over and they are attacking and defending rather than thinking and listening. With this in mind it is probably a waste of time trying to talk them out of it.

Deal With It. Or Don’t.
  1. I am a big fan of just letting them get on with it (and if it’s safe to do so, moving yourself away while they do) 
  2. If you can sell them the idea that they now have 2 bananas then great! It worked for my daughter, never has for Moose though. 
  3. If you’re in public don’t assume that you are being judged harshly. Most people are probably just trying to sympathise. 
  4. Try to stay calm. Easier said than done, granted, but if you can then it helps. A lot. 
  5. When your kid calms down (and they will, promise) then talk. Validate their feeling and maybe give it a name too. 

boy and legoIt’s not pleasant to have to deal with a tantrum but if you can remember that really they still have so much to learn then I think you are halfway there already.


Add your own tips in the comments below!

Besides, if you think that two’s really are terrible then you my friend have never parented a three year old! 

Love

Mummy & Moose 

Real Mum Reviews

 

 

 

 

Feeling All Blanket-ish

I hate feeling poorly. Hate hate hate it.

I spent Saturday with a bit of a headache and by Sunday this had evolved into a full-blown hide under a blanket on the sofa poorly head cold! I was just a groaning ball of symptoms, you name it I had it.

This is not ideal when they are things to be done and children to entertain. Not ideal at all. Usually I can manage, I pop a pill and just get on with it. As you Mums (and a few of you Dads) know it has to be done.                                                                                                               This time the pills weren’t touching it. I admitted defeat and bundled myself up for the day. MrG was on duty and did a good job of keeping the troupes inline – aside from us having to order pizza because of a lack of instant MrG friendly food in the fridge.

I found some herbal raspberry teabags in the cupboard which were <cough> only six months outside of their best before date so made myself a cuppa and added a big squeeze of honey to sooth my decidedly painful throat and some citrus to cut through the gross amount of mucus.

Nurse Moose

I snoozed for the best part of the day and in between naps, Moose did a very good job of playing nurse. He tucked my blanket in, gave me lots of hugs and brought me teddy bears and tissues as and when the need arose (it was a lot)

Admittedly I am still feeling rough today but I can’t sit on my hands any longer. Moose must go to preschool and I have work to do so I am dosed up and back to the daily grind. There is no doubt I will be off to bed early tonight but for now I will leave you with a few home remedies to try as recommended by some blog friends;

Always hot orange squash with a spoonful of manuka honey in it. That and vocalzone pastilles have seen me through many a performance with a horrendous cold! Maddy – The Speed Bump

Chicken noodle soup! I swear that stuff has magic powers when you’re sick… Kirsty – Life With Boys 

Hot water with honey & lemon juice! That, and sleep!! Sarah – Whimsical Mumblings

Hot Ribena! Fixes everything! Jon – The Money Shed

Manuka honey! Katie – Living Life Our Way

Rub vicks on your feet, socks on, works every time! Laura – Five Little Doves

A slice of potato on the inside of your socks To Reduce temperature whilst sleeping. It’s used commonly in Peru (we have friends there) and really does work Victoria – Mummy Times Two

Hot water, whisky and honey, if it doesn’t help get rid of the cold it helps me sleep through it
Kate – Modern Mum

Love 

Mummy & Moose

Making An Easy Lunch With Moose

We had an easy-ish morning.

As easy as it gets with a 2 year old anyway. Moose and I were bored so we decided to go for a walk around the local shops to kill some time. He always asks to sit in the ride on Noo-Noo outside the shop – luckily he has never seen it in action so as far as he knows it does nothing. I am not going to volunteer any information to the contrary until I absolutely have to and I am pretty sure it’s going to save me around a million pounds?

Back home

It was time for lunch. If you know Moose then you probably know that he SERIOUSLY dislikes vegetables. Of course I understand that small Humans generally lean toward white or beige food but Moose is my 3rd and the first 2 lulled me into a false sense of security. I thought I had it nailed, they would eat ANYTHING. I was naive to say the least.

He likes the following at the moment; ham, pasta, peas, sweetcorn, ketchup, cheese, bread, mashed potato, chips (of course) and eggs. Luckily he loves fruit. That does not help with Veg situation though. 

We are trying to buy less and most importantly waste less food, I remembered that I had some tomatoes in the cupboard. One thing Moose and I both love is PIZZA so I thought I might try and whip up something Pizza-esque. We cut up some bread we had going a bit stale in the larder and Moose spread some Cirio Pizza Sauce on to the slices. Then he added a couple of baby spinach leaves (which mummy had chopped) and then a sprinkle of cheese and a slice of ham – I was also going to cut this up but when I tried to remove it from Moose’ vice like grip he screamed and I thought better of it.

As you can see, Moose was very pleased with his lunchtime adventure. I was very pleased with him eating tomatoes AND spinach! HE ATE TOMATOES!! Not out of a ketchup bottle! 

It was also really nice to get him in the kitchen and helping. He loved cooking and we had a really fun time putting it all together – it really didn’t take long either!

I do like a happy ending

love  

Mummy & Moose

Disclosure: We were sent the above products for the purpose of this review however all opinions are my own.

BRAT is the word of the day

The Lurgy Is Upon Us

Now that the children are back at school, we have tackled Bonfire night and Halloween and Christmas day is coming it’s time for the winter stomach bugs. They are inevitable in this house and my Facebook feed tells me we are not at all alone!

   rice

So, how DO we deal with a problem like Diarrhea?*

Dehydration

It is really easy for little ones to get dehydrated when they are suffering with vomiting and diarrhea. You can offer water and even milk if they will take it but make sure they are sipping, not gulping their drinks. I always gave Col & Bess fruit teas when they were younger. Ginger is a good one for nausea. If your baby has a bout of sickness it is safe to continue to offer them their usual milk and if you are breastfeeding and have a bout of sickness there is no medical reason for you to stop nursing – aside from feeling like shit obviously

toast

Something To Nibble

While they are vomiting it is best to stick to clear liquids but that won’t be forever. It’s always tough to know when to introduce solid foods back into your child’s diet after a bout of sickness. Bland is key as is little and often. A good way to get them nibbling again without stressing out their system too harshly is by using the BRAT rule.

Bananas Rice Applesauce Toast 

You can’t really stick to this for more than a day or maybe 2 after the sickness has stopped so you should be re-introducing fruits and vegetables as soon as you can after your child starts to feel well.

It is very normal for a weaned baby/toddler to regress after a bout of sickness. Of course Vegetables are the first thing they cross off their list of must eats. Don’t worry too much about that, just let them take their own time.

I usually make some scones. You can add all sorts of things to them such as cheese or grated vegetables.

poorlycol

The most important thing to remember is this. It won’t last long and when it is finished you will have earned yourself a considerably large glass of your favourite beverage. If you can keep it down..

*You saw what I did there, right?

I Can’t Remember When I Last Fed My Child

I remember the first time.

I can recall when he was born the frustration of knowing I had nursed 2 children previously without any issue and the midwife saying that he needed to be given formula right away because he just wasn’t taking enough from my breasts. I remember feeling confused as to why the act that I ha20141017_171337d assumed would be as natural to this hairy little beast as it had been to his brother and sister was just not happening.

I remember feeling pissed off with myself because as much as I knew that I wanted to breastfeed I was just too tired to argue after being in pain for hours before. I remember the temporary relief as he was taken away for his “first proper feed” as they put it and then of course that first flush of our favourite – Mummy guilt.

Mummy guilt is a bitch. I don’t know about you but for me it is there from day 1 right through to, well, I don’t know the answer to that because actually I am 15 years 7 months and 5 days into being a Mum and that guilt has been ever present. That’s ok and I think I would miss it now if I didn’t feel it.

I remember how sad I felt when the midwives (who really were just trying to help I am sure) offered to go get a bottle of formula the following day when again my tiny boy just would not latch. All I could do was in my hospital bed feeling uncomfortable, alone and utterly defeated.

I remember later when my sister arrived. My sister who is 8 years my junior, as fierce in personality as she is short in stature and who as luck would have it also happened to be a breastfeeding peer support. Into my room she strode clearly excited to see her new nephew and armed with the best of gifts for a new mother; COLD caffeinated fizzy drinks and the best kind of junk food. She may as well have been wearing a full set of armour and riding a white steed (probably frowned upon in most hospitals). Moments after she took a look at my fed up face and I had relayed the situation she had marched off and returned with the largest breast pump I had ever laid eyes on. An instant game changer and I had the help I needed.

Of course it was still tough. I soon realised that my little Moose was a snacker – that meant I could kiss goodbye to more than a couple of hours sleep a night. I found my peace holding my beautiful boy close while the rest of the world (or so it felt) snoozed. With a lot of trial and error we got to the 6 month point – that’s where I stopped nursing his siblings – and on we went. When we reached 1 year people began raising an eyebrow if the subject arose. At 18 months I stopped volunteering the information. I was never ashamed or embarrassed about it, quite the contrary but I think people just assumeDSC_1241d that we had moved on. We hadn’t.

I often thought then about how and when we should stop breastfeeding. There is a fair bit written about how to start nursing but not much about how to end it.

Do I wait for my son to stop? Would he ever? Should I instigate the stopping process? What the fuck would a stopping process involve anyway? What if he was still breastfeeding when he started preschool? If they are old enough to ask, is that too old? Did I care if society said it was?

It was something that had become part of his (and my) every day. As much as I am not a fan of routine really, this kind of was our routine and oh man. Those cuddles first thing in the morning and last thing at night. What would make me want to miss those? I read about picking a date and making that the last supper (as it were) and then one day not too long ago I realised that we were sitting on the sofa and we were having a cuddle.

He wasn’t pulling at my top or getting cross because I wouldn’t give him milk. We were just having a cuddle. In a way I wish I could have seen it coming so I could have made myself treasure those last feeds but that’s just not how it happened. As we cuddled I realised that I wasn’t sure how or when we started stopping…

…and that, was that. It was hard, it was easy. We had learnt how together and then it was over